On the Go Answers from the Ultimate Mother Daughter Dynamic Duo

Getting Hip to Peer Pressure and Nutrition

 

Do you remember a moment as a girl when you felt uncomfortable in your body?

If you, like many of us, have struggled with your relationship to food, body and weight —

Then maybe you can remember one of the first moments —

Maybe it was when you hit puberty and your body began to change?

When you went to sprint across the soccer field and your breasts jiggled and hurt for the first time… and you slowed down.

When you first got unwanted attention walking down the street.

When someone said something and you first catalogued that you were too ____ of something. Too short. Too tall. Too curvy. Too big. Too loud. Too hairy. Maybe that’s an old story that only recently stopped playing so loud in your head.

As mamas, we want our precious girls to feel safe, comfortable and loved in their bodies. It may be the thing we want most in the whole world. Right?

Today, on the blog, we’re talking about how peer pressure can cross paths with eating habits to create a nasty trend: skipping meals.

This is an extraordinary way to change the narrative with your daughter around food, body love, and trusting herself. And we want to invite you to up your education on this piece so your girl isn’t (potentially) tackling this social situation alone. Especially if you find that it’s something you, consciously or unconsciously, end up doing too!

It’s time to get hip, mama.

Click the video below to watch!

Once you’ve gotten a chance to check out the video, leave a comment below — because collective wisdom rocks, and we want to hear your take. We need each other, mama.

 

 

Love,

 

Sil & Eliza

P.S. Share this video with a mama in your circle who wants to raise a body sane daughter too — because sharing is caring, and everyone could use a stronger bond.

Hi, We’re Sil & Eliza!

The mother-daughter dynamic duo behind Mothering & Daughtering. We’re downright devoted to you thriving not just surviving with your daughter during the preteen, teen years and beyond.

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